17 Jul 2015

Do you have a garden patch that you’re unsure what to do with? Or are you looking for a plant that would look spectacular in a pot? Succulents just may be your answer. Despite the persisting myth that succulents are difficult to grow, there are varieties that are actually quite hardy and put on a stunning display.

Do you have a garden patch that you’re unsure what to do with? Or are you looking for a plant that would look spectacular in a pot? Succulents just may be your answer. Despite the persisting myth that succulents are difficult to grow, there are varieties that are actually quite hardy and put on a stunning display.

The key to growing succulents successfully is soil preparation: if the soil doesn’t drain properly the roots will rot and the plant will die. Each individual plants have their own preference, so always consult the label first. But in general, succulents prefer well-draining soil, so adding a bit of sand before planting is recommended.

 

 


Aloe Vera

Not only is this spiky, evergreen succulent interesting to look at, but it can also be used for medicinal purposes. For hundreds of years, aloe vera has been successfully used to relieve the pain of burns, and is highly used in commercial burn creams for that very reason. Aloe does well in pots, but can also be easily grown in the ground.



Hens and Chicks

This rosette style succulent is named as such as the main plant (the hen) produces so many babies (chicks). This succulent prefers a drier soil and grows very well in pots. Allow the soil to dry out between watering for best results.
 
 



Golden Sedum

When planted in a full-sun location, the Golden Sedum will turn a more intense orange colour – the more sun it gets, the more colour it will have. They make a great focal point, and contrast against the traditional green foliage of its cousins.
 
 



Snake Plant

This stunning succulent features long pointed leaves in green and yellow colours. The name comes from the snake-like pattern that develops on the leaves and does well in both pots and the garden.
 
 



Burros Tail

This is best planted in hanging pots, as the greenish-blue coloured foliage can grow up to three metres long. The Burros Tail features tiny red flowers, delicate leaves but is hardy when planted in correct conditions.
 
 



Blue Wave

With its distinctive leaves, the Blue Wave is a delicate looking succulent with ruffled purple edges. How much purple develops depends on how much sun the plant gets as it prefers a full-sun location.
 
 



Purple Aeonium

A little different to the rest, this succulent grows on stalks and so resembles a small tree. With purplish-black foliage that forms the shape of the flowers, the Purple Aeonium is used to give the garden a bit of height.
 
 



String of Pearls

Another plant that’s best grown indoors in hanging pots, the String of Pearls actually resembles a string of green pearls. Keep this out of direct sunlight, avoid overwatering, and don’t fuss with it too much.
 
 



Christmas Cactus

One of the hardiest and most commonly found succulents, the Christmas Cactus is popular because of its low maintenance and beautiful flowers. Best grown in pots, make sure that you avoid over watering and allow the roots to dry out a bit occasionally.
 
 



Paddle Plant

This is best kept indoors or out of direct sunlight and is popular because of the pink tint around the edges of the leaves. The foliage itself resembles small paddles, hence the name. Water this plant occasionally, but it does best when left alone.